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Conservative Corner: What Runners and Politicians Have in Common

Feature photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Many people may not have pain management, but they really want it.

Take a minute and imagine yourself training for a marathon.

When training begins, it’s really, really tough, and you want to throw in the towel. Who really wants to run a marathon, anyway?

That first long run is dreadful; you have not one desire to keep pushing through, but you know you have to.

You have to accomplish that first run so you can hit that end goal: finishing the marathon.

No doubt that it’s daunting at first, but you have to take any race mile by mile — even yard by yard or foot by foot.

You’re going to fail if all you do is think,

Oh my goodness, I have to run 26.2 miles,

for the three plus hours it may take you to finish the race.

It’s this same thought process that Congress exhibits or does not exhibit on a daily basis.

The Senate and House might be discussing what type of regulations will be best for the general welfare of the people, but they might also have a “side piece” of legislation about education reform.

How in the world will they get anything done doing things like that?

It is a simple question to ask, but it is a very difficult one to answer. Certain aspects of legislation are very much intertwined, and it makes it difficult to focus on just one thing at a time, or even seven things at a time.

It’s like running.  With each mile, the body gets more tired. Your physical and mental capacity might be giving up on you, or you might just be plain dead.

There is something within each of us, I believe, that allows us to regain focus and seek solutions for the task at hand.

Back to Congress. Senator Rand Paul’s solution entailed a filibuster concerning the Fifth Amendment, the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment and killing Americans on American soil.

Recently President Obama gave a questionable answer if it was acceptable to kill Americans on American soil with drones.

He said,

We haven’t done it yet,

to which Senator Paul responded in his filibuster, and yes, I am paraphrasing, “We cannot be comforted by such a statement.”

This discussion has come amongst the gun control and sequestration debates.  These conversations deserve great attention by themselves.

Senator Paul went on stressing the importance of the consolidation of government and the separation of powers.

The executive branch cannot have the powers of all three branches within itself.

This centralization of power is a reasonable concern that senators, congressmen, local officials and the general public alike, all have in common.

We cannot let one man or one cabinet have this type of power.  The presidency cannot have executive, judicial and legislative power in one man or a few appointed cabinet members.

Think back to that marathon example. Paul knew he had to manage his “pain” well just like one does in a marathon, half-marathon or any other training one must do for any race.

Paul’s concentration was simple. He wanted to stress the importance of what the founders thought about the separation of powers. Paul took an approach that would leave the government stable but also secure the rights founded in the Bill of Rights and the Due Process Clause and make sure they were not taken away.

Paul managed his pain well, even though it ran the risk of the other members not even listening to what he was saying.

He knew John Brennan would get confirmed. But Paul said he made his tireless effort not to protest the confirmation of John Brennan as CIA Director, but to make the American public aware of how important the separation of powers is.

I personally believe Paul was successful in making the American people aware of the importance of having distinct separation of powers between the three branches of government.

It is our job as the people of this country to elect individuals that will hold the ideas on the separation of powers very seriously.

We need to elect individuals that are willing to do the unpopular things, as Paul seemed to do, for principles derived from the separation of powers.

 

Conservative Corner: What Runners and Politicians Have in Common Reviewed by on . Feature photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net Many people may not have pain management, but they really want it. Take a minute and imagine yourself training f Feature photo courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net Many people may not have pain management, but they really want it. Take a minute and imagine yourself training f Rating:
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